C04 | Metrics for Mobile Visualization and Interaction Techniques through
“Research in the Large”

Prof. Niels Henze, University of Stuttgart
Email | Website

Niels Henze

Prof. Harald Reiterer, University of Konstanz
Email | Website

Harald Reiterer

Valentin Schwind, University of Stuttgart – Website, Email

Huy Viet Le, University of Suttgart – Website, Email

Models and metrics of visualization and interaction techniques can predict the time a person needs to understand presented information and to execute a task. Previous work mainly focused on basic models. What is missing are models and metrics for realistic use cases and novel interactive systems. We will upscale the quantitative investigations of visualization and interaction techniques to evaluate multiple factors at the same time. Using a research in the large approach, in which the apparatus is distributed to thousands participants through mobile applications stores, we will quantify the effect of different degrees of freedom for interactive visualizations and derive models that enable to predict users' performance.

Research Questions

What are the models behind human behavior in mobile hand interaction?

How does the virtual hand appearance influence interaction?

How can we quantify multi-factorial models of visualization and interaction using huge data sets through research in large?

Publications

  1. V. Schwind, K. Wolf, and N. Henze, “FaceMaker - A Procedural Face Generator to Foster Character Design Research,” vol. Game Dynamics: Best Practices in Procedural and Dynamic Game Content Generation, O. Korn and N. Lee, Eds. Cham: Springer International Publishing, 2017, pp. 95–113.
  2. V. Schwind, K. Leicht, S. Jäger, K. Wolf, and N. Henze, “Is there an Uncanny Valley of Virtual Animals? A Quantitative and Qualitative Investigation,” International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, vol. 111, pp. 49–61, 2018.
  3. P. Knierim, V. Schwind, A. M. Feit, F. Nieuwenhuizen, and N. Henze, “‘Physical keyboards in virtual reality: analysis of typing performance and effects of avatar hands,’” in CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, 2018, pp. 345:1–345:9.
  4. A. Voit, T. Machulla, D. Weber, V. Schwind, S. Schneegass, and N. Henze, “Proceedings of the 18th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services Adjunct - MobileHCI ’16,” in Proceedings of the 18th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services Adjunct - MobileHCI ’16, 2016, pp. 942--947.
  5. V. Schwind, P. Knierim, C. Tasci, P. Franczak, N. Haas, and N. Henze, “These Are Not My Hands!": Effect of Gender on the Perception of Avatar Hands in Virtual Reality,” in Proceedings of the 2017 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Denver, Colorado, USA, 2017, vol. CHI ’17, no. 6, pp. 1577--1582.
  6. P. Knierim et al., “Tactile Drones - Providing Immersive Tactile Feedback in Virtual Reality Through Quadcopters,” in Proceedings of the 2016 CHI Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Denver, Colorado, USA, 2017, vol. CHI EA ’17, pp. 433--436.
  7. L. Lischke, V. Schwind, K. Friedrich, A. Schmidt, and N. Henze, “MAGIC-Pointing on Large High-Resolution Displays,” in CHI EA ’16 Proceedings of the 34rd Annual ACM Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, 2016, pp. 1706–1712.
  8. T. Dingler, R. Rzayev, A. S. Shirazi, and N. Henze, “‘Designing consistent gestures across device types: eliciting rsvp controls for phone, watch, and glasses,’” in “Designing consistent gestures across device types: eliciting rsvp controls for phone, watch, and glasses,” 2018, no. 419:1–419:12.
  9. V. Schwind, P. Knierim, L. Chuang, and N. Henze, “‘Where’s Pinky?’: The Effects of a Reduced Number of Fingers in Virtual Reality,” in Proceedings of the 2017 CHI Conference on Computer-Human Interaction in Play, Amsterdam, Netherlands, 2017, vol. CHI PLAY’17, p. 6.
  10. T. Dingler, R. Rzayev, V. Schwind, and N. Henze, “RSVP on the go - Implicit Reading Support on Smart Watches Through Eye Tracking,” in Proceedings of the 2016 ACM International Symposium on Wearable Computers - ISWC ’16, New York, New York, USA, 2016, pp. 116–119.
  11. H. V. Le, V. Schwind, P. Göttlich, and N. Henze, “PredicTouch: A System to Reduce Touchscreen Latency using Neural Networks and Inertial Measurement Units,” in Proceedings of the 2017 International Conference on Interactive Surfaces and Spaces, 2017, vol. 17, pp. 230–239.
  12. V. Schwind and S. Jäger, “The Uncanny Valley and the Importance of Eye Contact.,” i-com, vol. 15, no. 1, pp. 93–104, 2016.